Volume 6, Issue 4, December 2020, Page: 72-75
Applied Science Research for All Part 1 Pre-College Level
Steven Oppenheimer, Department of Biology and Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, California, United States
Mindy Berman, Department of Biology and Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, California, United States
Helen Chun, Department of Biology and Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, California, United States
Alvalyn Lundgren, Department of Biology and Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, California, United States
Stacy Tanaka, Department of Biology and Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, California, United States
Aphrodite Antoniou, Department of Biology and Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, California, United States
Terri Miller, Department of Biology and Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, California, United States
Greg Zem, Department of Biology and Center for Cancer and Developmental Biology, California State University, Northridge, Northridge, California, United States
Received: Oct. 9, 2020;       Accepted: Oct. 21, 2020;       Published: Nov. 9, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajasr.20200606.11      View  26      Downloads  15
Abstract
The field of applied scientific research is important for the health, welfare and security of all countries in the world. Applied research scientists should be involved in the education of new generations of investigators. Institutions can reward them for such participation. It is well known that science fairs only reward a few winners and hundreds of others are left with no reward and possibly less inspiration to continue in science. In fact, Finland was ranked at the top in the U.N. World Happiness Report primarily because it aims not to leave any student behind, instead of only nurturing high achievers. This paper is intended to interest applied research scientists in the education of new generations of prospective applied researchers by presenting programs that do not leave any interested students behind. As presented in a National Science Teaching Association Commentary, by Steve Oppenheimer read by hundreds of thousands in the education community, and in a National Science Foundation webinar, this paper for the first time brings 2 key programs to applied scientists. One is a journal, whose 25 annual volumes inspire all students. The other is a symposium that does the same. The concept of science research for all students helped Steve Oppenheimer, win a U.S. Presidential Award for mentoring (PAESMEM), presented at the White House by President Obama. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) cited Steve’s work with K-12 programs, as well as his glycobiology research, in his election as Fellow AAAS. In the journal and symposium there are only rare rejections. Problem submissions are corrected. The late Nobel laureate Francis Crick, who believed in the motto of science research for all, was an early collaborator in these programs. These programs can be easily replicated, especially with the involvement of applied research scientists, who in partnership with the education community, can interest many more students in applied research science. The involvement of Dr. Crick attests to the importance of bringing research scientists into these training programs. Many universities and organizations will count mentoring involvement in evaluating scientists for tenure and promotion.
Keywords
Pre-college Research, Involvement of Applied Researchers, Journal and Symposium
To cite this article
Steven Oppenheimer, Mindy Berman, Helen Chun, Alvalyn Lundgren, Stacy Tanaka, Aphrodite Antoniou, Terri Miller, Greg Zem, Applied Science Research for All Part 1 Pre-College Level, American Journal of Applied Scientific Research. Vol. 6, No. 4, 2020, pp. 72-75. doi: 10.11648/j.ajasr.20200606.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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